C-Section with Twins: What You Need to Know

Shares

We all know that caesarian births are more likely with twins, so if you’re expecting, it’s normal to be wondering just what goes in a c-section with twins.

Read more about the chance of you having a twins c section vs natural birth, and how it’s going to affect your recovery and post birth struggles.C-Section with Twins

What is a c-section?

A caesarian section is when a baby is delivered through an incision in your abdomen.

A lot of c-section births are scheduled in advance, so you’ll already know going in that you’re going to give birth this way. Sometimes though, a complication with a natural birth can result in an emergency c-section.

Either way, c-sections are safe, effective and easy, which is more and more babies are delivered by c-section every year.

Your twin c-section procedure will generally follow normal c-section procedures. A small incision of around 5 or 6 inches will be made in your abdomen, and then into the uterus. Your babies are then removed through this incision, which is then treated and surgically closed again.

How much more likely is a c-section with twins?

First off, it’s important to know how much more likely it is that you’re going to have to have a c-section with twins.

The answer? Not that much more likely, surprisingly.

According to the CDC, just over 30% of singleton births are delivered by caesarian, and the figures for twins aren’t that much higher, around 40%. Around another 4% delivered one baby vaginally, and the second through a c-section.

What this means is that you’ve still got a better than 50 percent chance of delivering both babies naturally, if that’s what you’re hoping for, but that if you do have a c-section, you’re joining the a large group of women, and it’s completely normal and natural. So there’s no reason to worry.

How long does a c-section take with twins?

Honestly, barely longer than a singleton birth. The real time sinks with caesarian births are the prep and clean up afterwards. The actual birth itself will take 5 or 10 minutes, barely longer.

Expect the whole procedure to take a few hours. Maybe two or three, with a few hours on either side for check ups and aftercare.

What are the after effects of a c-section?

The main issue with a c-section is of course the scar. You’ve probably heard horror stories about c-section scars, but the truth is that for the vast majority of women it’s never going to be a problem.

If you have a c-section you’re most probably going to end up with a small and easily manageable scar around the top line of your panties. Most of the time, after a few months the scar will be tiny and hidden behind normal clothes, even bikinis!

Other effects that can come from a c-section include:

  • Infection of the wound. Common and easily treatable with antibiotics.
  • Infection of the womb lining. Pretty much the same as the above.
  • Excessive bleeding. Slightly less common, and might require a blood transfusion.
  • Deep vein thrombosis. Blood clots in your legs that can cause pain, swelling and can cause further complications.
  • Damage to the bladder or kidneys. Rare, but can require further surgery.

Bear in mind that the vast majority of these issues are incredibly rare, and pretty much all of them can be dealt with by your doctor and medical team.

What will happen after your c-section?

You’ll normally be in hospital for a few days after your c-section, to make sure that you’re healing correctly and capable of looking after yourself.

First, your scar will be covered with steri-strips, which are there to keep your wound closed and sterile. You’re good to shower at this time, just don’t wash on or close to the wound, and try not to submerge it in water, so avoid baths for the first couple of weeks.

It’s also good to avoid lifting anything heavy. Your baby should be pretty much your limit, so take it easy!

Tips for dealing with a c-section scar

  • Make sure you take your pain meds whenever you’re supposed to, whether you’re in pain or not.
  • Wear comfy, supportive clothing, like yoga pants or a belly wrap.
  • On top of this, it’s great to wear supportive underwear. Buy some granny panties if you have to. Now isn’t the time to worry about what you’re wearing.
  • Keep drinking water, and make sure you drink as soon as you’re comfortable after the surgery.
  • Take advantage of your hospital’s night time nursery, because you’re going to need your rest. Another great advantage of this is that it also helps get your babies used to the bottle
  • If your partner or family offer help, then take it. I know you want to be strong, but trust us, you’ll need as much help as you can.
  • On that note, prepare your husband, because he’s probably going to be doing a lot for you in the next few weeks, and if he’s coming into surgery with you, he might see a lot that he’s not expecting.
  • Have a massage when you get released from hospital, because it helps to free up and release all of the fluids that will be in your body from the surgery and bed rest.
  • It’s good to get a notebook so you can record everything. Record when your twins eat, sleep, go to the toilet, so you can see how everything is going.
  • Lastly, rest as much as possible. You need to heal, and the best thing for that is rest and recuperation.

Remember, c-sections are completely normal, and nothing to worry about. Just follow whatever your doctor says and you’ll be fine!

Did you have a c-section with twins? How did it go? Do you have any advice for moms heading in this direction? Whatever advice you have is going to be amazing.

Why not join our community and write about your experience? There’s nothing like hearing from someone who has already been there.

>